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Frequently Asked Questions: Judging
(last revised: 5/5/06)

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How does Turboshred work?
What do I judge?
What's the difference between a mark and a score?
Is there an official scoresheet?
Do I have to write down a number for every sequence?
What's the shot clock?
What does consecutive mean?
What happens if the player gets a bad throw?
How do I judge co-ops?
What if someone does the same combo over and over?
What if the player drops the combo?
How do I figure out my score?
Do you drop the highest and lowest scores from judges?


How does Turboshred work?
A group of players will jam for you. Your job is to score each individual player's moves. Players will throw to each other like in a recreational jam, and each player will have a possession of about 30 seconds to do their thing. If they drop the disc, their possession is over. At the end of their jam, you'll submit your top scores for each player.

What do I judge?
Difficulty. That's all. How hard was the move that player just did? Judge the portion of the combo the player completes. Judge each combo as long as it stays consecutive - one possession can have multiple marks if the player breaks consecutivity. There are different standards for consecutivity (all restricted, rhythm of the combo, etc.). Whatever definition you use, be consistent for all players.

What's the difference between a mark and a score?
A mark is the number from 1-100 that you give for each sequence. The score is your final tally that you turn over to the head judge.

Is there an official scoresheet?
If the tournament director does not give you an official scoresheet, split your scoresheet into columns. Have one column for each player . Write the player's name on top and anything you need to identify players you don't know (for example: red shirt, barefoot, beard). Each time a player does a sequence, write your mark in their column.

Do I have to write down a number for every sequence?
No. Once you write down a few marks for a player, you'll know whether they are improving on their second best score. You may not remember every player's scoring range during the competition, so to be safe mark down any score that's near the player's top two scores. If a player's combo doesn't live up to earlier moves, just sit back, catch your breath and enjoy the show.

What's the shot clock?
There is a time limit on each disc possession so every player has an equal chance to shred. The shot clock starts on the player's first move or contact with the disc and ends 30 seconds later. If the shot clock expires, the head judge can call off the player's combo. You stop judging the difficulty if the head judge calls off the combo.

What does consecutive mean?
There are many levels of consecutivity, but the main meaning is going from one move directly into another move without using a THE (unrestricted front-of-body) delay. Some judges may choose to apply consecutivity to tipping and airbrushing too.

What happens if the player gets a bad throw?
If a player gets a bad throw or doesn't play the disc, don't bother giving them a mark. They will request a rethrow. They get one rethrow at their discretion each round plus an unlimited number of rethrows if the throw itself was wild or really bad.

How do I judge co-ops?
Players may do cooperative sequences, and you should give marks for these sequences. How you judge it will depend on what happens on the field and your philosophy of the difficulty of co-oping. Use this rule of thumb: score each consecutive co-op sequence according to what each player does. If player A did most of the difficulty in the sequence, you could give her a 67 and the other player a 43. If both players shared the load on a really difficult co-op, you might give both players an 80.

What if someone does the same combo over and over?
It's unlikely that players will do the exact same combo over and over, but it may happen. Someone may have certain sequences wired, and they may go for them several times during the jam. If someone does the exact same combo several times, only one of the combos can count. Give all of them a score, but only keep the best score for that combo. Keep in mind that this applies only to doing the exact same moves in a row. If a player mixes it up with different sets, different catches or a different order of moves, score it as a unique sequence.

What if the player drops the combo?
They still get a mark for the sequence. They demonstrated difficulty in performing the moves up to the drop. Give them the same credit for moves before the catch as you would for a player who caught the sequence. It's up to your discretion how to deal with the drop. Some judges disregard the whole catch when adding up the difficulty of the sequence. For others, there is difficulty in getting the body into position for the catch.

How do I figure out my score?
At the end of the jam, look at the marks you gave to each player. Pick out the top two marks for each player, and add them up. You should have a mark from 2-200 for each player. Give that to the judge, who will average the scores to reach a final score

Do you drop the highest and lowest scores from judges?
No, the scores are averaged.


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