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Frequently Asked Questions: Running Turboshred Competitions
(last revised: 5/5/06)

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What is Turboshred?
Do I have to follow rigid rules to run Turboshred events?
It's SO expensive to reserve fields for sports!
How do I get players to enter?
Do I have to promote the event?
What equipment do I need?
How much should the entry fee be?
The players are here. What now?
Now I know who's playing. How do I put them into jams?
How much time does each pool play?
What music should I play?
What's a possession?
What's the shot clock?
Who are the judges?
What is judged?
How do I come up with scores for each player?
Do you drop the highest and lowest scores from judges?
Okay, they just finished their eight minute jam, and we know the scores. Now what?
What happens if a player gets a bad throw?
Can a player request a rethrow if it's not a bad throw?
Is it just a free-for-all in the jam?
This is an individual competition, so players shouldn't be co-oping, right?
Can players use the z-machine for throws?
How many discs can each pool use?
Which player throws first?
Will there be play-by-play?
How do I put my articles, photos or video onto the Turboshred site?


What is Turboshred?
Turboshred is an experimental freestyle flying disc competition that encourages aggressive, big move play. Turboshred events are easy to run. They are designed to be a show-up-and-jam format with little overhead. Bring a boombox, some paper and pencils and invite your friends. That's all you need! For more details, read on.

Do I have to follow rigid rules to run Turboshred events?
No. The Turboshred format will evolve based on feedback from each Turboshred competition. Eventually, there may be standards for some tournamentfeatures (jamtime, how many moves count, shot clock, etc.), but organizers are encouraged to tailor the competition to their needs and to inform players in advance about all the details of the competition format.

It's SO expensive to reserve fields for sports!
So don't reserve a field. Many times you can just show up and play at a public field as long as you don't use a sound system, aren't selling sponsorships, won't sue the field owner and you remember that you're sharing it with the general public.

How do I get players to enter?
Get the word out with as much advanced notice as possible! Put an article on Shrednow. Add it to the tournament schedule on the Freestyle Players Association website. Announce it to players on Jammers On The Net, at tournaments, at schools, on the radio or through whatever other media you have available. Call players. Beg them. Plead.

Do I have to promote the event?
No. Low-tech underground competitions are frequently the most fun and successful.

What equipment do I need?
You need some sort of sound system. A boombox will work for 99% of Turboshred events. If your event is promoted to the public, or if it is at a more public venue, you may want to get a real sound system.

You will also need paper and pencils for the judges, and if possible clipboards for them to write on. You will need a stopwatch or a digital watch to keep track of the jamtime.

How much should the entry fee be?
Smaller club tournaments might not charge anything. If you charge an entry fee, make sure it covers your basic costs. If you want to charge more, try to balance the ability of players to pay versus the value of your time in organizing the event.

The players are here. What now?
Find out who's playing in the tournament. Have a sign-up sheet. Let people know the deadline for when they have to sign up.

Now I know who's playing. How do I put them into jams?
Get the world rankings from Shrednow. Follow the seeding procedure in the FPA Competition Manual. To decide how many pools you need, divide the total number of players by 4. If it divides evenly, that is the number of pools. If there is any remainder, you need one extra pool. Distribute the players into pools according to zizag pattern described in the FPA Competition Manual. Four pools would go like this:
Pool APool BPool CPool D
#1#2#3#4
#8#7#6#5
#9#10#11#12
#13#14#15#16

How much time does each pool play?
90 seconds to 2 minutes per jammer. With four players in each pool, they will play for 6-8 minutes.

What music should I play?
Ideally, players should be able to choose music. To be fair, let each player in a pool suggest one song. Pick two to three songs randomly and play 3-4 minues of each of them.

What's a possession?
Every time a freestyler gets the disc is called a posession. A possession starts with the player's first move or contact with the disc. A possession ends either when the disc is caught, dropped or when the shot clock expires.

What's the shot clock?
Every freestyler in a group needs to have an equal chance to shred, so there is a time limit on each disc possession. The shot clock starts on the player's first move or contact with the disc and ends 30 seconds later. If the shot clock expires, the head judge can call off the player's combo, and the player throws to the next competitor. The head judge needs to be consistent. If he calls off one jammer at 30 seconds, all jammers need to be called off at 30 seconds. If he lets a jammer play longer, other players need to receive equal treatment.

Who are the judges?
The ideal situation is to have a judging panel made up of knowledeable players who are not entered. Try to have at least 3 judges. If non-entered judges aren't available, players from one pool judge the other pool. Try to choose the most fair and knowledgeable judges while not forcing players to judge too many rounds.

What is judged?
Difficulty. That's all. How hard is each consecutive sequence? If you break consecutivity, a new sequence begins. Players can accumulate multiple scores per possession, but they should not disrupt the flow of the jam with re-revs. Judges will consider whether the attempted move is completed. For more details, go to the judging FAQ.

How do I come up with scores for each player?
Each time a player finishes a consecutve sequence, he/she gets a score from 1-100 from each judge. At the end of the round, each judge finds their two highest scores for each player. Those scores are totaled and divided by the number of judges.

Do you drop the highest and lowest scores from judges?
No, the scores are averaged. Dropping the high and low scores might be good if you have lots of judges on the panel or if you feel like some judges are scoring in a narrow range and others in a wide range.

Okay, they just finished their eight minute jam, and we know the scores. Now what?
The top two scorers advance to the next round. The bottom two scorers either go to a consolation round or a playoff. This is described in detail on the brackets FAQ.

What happens if a player gets a bad throw?
A player can request a rethrow if he/she gets a substandard throw or a wild throw. There is no penalty to the thrower for the first bad throw, but the thrower's score is penalized 5 points for each subsequent bad throw. The head judge determines whether or not it was a bad throw.

Can a player request a rethrow if it's not a bad throw?
Yes. Each player gets one rethrow no questions asked in each round. The player can pick any thrower to give a second shot at the move.

Is it just a free-for-all in the jam?
Yes, if you're talking about players doing whatever sick moves they want. No, if you're talking about who gets the disc. Every player gets an equal chance at disc possessions.

The etiquette: a player can't have another possession until everyone else has as many possessions as them. If a player skips a turn, it counts just like that player had a possession.

A good way for players to signal that they want the disc is to hold their hand up for the thrower. The thrower picks who goes next.

The receiver of the throw is responsible for letting the thrower know what kind of throw they want. If the thrower can't give a good throw to the next player in the jam, he/she can ask another player to throw the disc. No player, however, should be imposed upon to throw too often.

This is an individual competition, so players shouldn't be co-oping, right?
Wrong! Co-ops are a huge part of jamming. A player may use his possession for co-oping. The possession counts against that player's tally of possessions. He/she can invite whoever he/she wants from the jam group. The judges will score each consecutive co-op sequence according to what each player does.


Strategically, players have found that co-oping does not improve scores.
Can players use the z-machine for throws?
It's not recommended. The z-machine is a great invention, but it's not great at promoting the flow of the jam, and that's a big feature of Turboshred competitions.
How many discs can each pool use?
One. Players should try to mutually agree on a disc. If they can't decide, the head judge chooses one.

Which player throws first?
If players cannot mutually agree, they should flip discs to determine who throws first and who gets the first possession.

Will there be play-by-play?
As a TD of a low-key Turboshred event, it's not your responsibility to provide play-by-play. Turboshred encourages play-by-play, though, for a few reasons. It helps any spectators understand what's going on, and it gives announcers practice at calling freestyle jams in real-time. When Turboshred competitions are held in venues with more spectators, charismatic and knowledgeable announcers will add tremendously to the show.

How do I report results or add articles, photos or video to the Turboshred site?
The Turboshred site is a resource about the Turboshred format. The best place for Turboshred news, results, videos and photos is Shrednow. Any registered member can submit articles and photos there.

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Arthur Coddington. All Rights Reserved.